2017 Summer Course Schedule

 

SESSION I  (May 15- June 23)

Course #

Title

Instructor

Days

Time

Room

AMST120  Hyphenated Americans Isabel Balseiro (HMC)

 MW

9am-12:10pm

Broad Center 207

ART 126* Large Format Landscape Photography Tarrah Krajnak (PZ)

 MTWTH (2 Week Course)

 1pm-6pm

Scott Hall 12

CSCI005 Introduction to Computer Science Zach Dodds (HMC)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

Broad Hall 213

EA 31  Restoring Nature Paul Faulstitch (PZ)

MW

9am-12:10pm

Broad Center 208

ECON 51  Principles of Macro Economics Meric Keskinel (PZ)

MW

 1pm – 4:10pm

Bernard 101

ECON 91  Statistics Roberto Pedace (SC)

MW

9am-12:10pm

Bernard 101

ENGL34 Fiction Workshop Adam Novy (PZ)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

West Hall P103

MATH 189 Big Data Analytics Weiqing Gu (HMC)

MWF

3:15pm-5:20pm

Broad Hall 213

MS 82A Intro to Video Art Stephanie Hutin (PZ)

MW

1pm-4:10pm

West Hall P104

MS 149 Theory and Aesthetics of Television Thomas Connelly (PO)

TTH

1pm-4:10pm

West Hall P103

PSYC 101 Brain and Behavior Thomas Borowski (PZ)

MWF

1pm-3:05pm

Scott Hall 230 

SOC 81 Sociology Through Film Phil Zuckerman (PZ)

TTH

7pm-10:10pm

Broad Hall 110

* Courses with an asterisk are not 6 week courses, they are two week intensive courses (noted in their course descriptions). 

Course Descriptions

AMST 120 PZ: This seminar focuses on the experience of immigrants in the United States and Americans of diverse ethnic backgrounds, as reflected in literature and critical theory. The course will weave together works that treat the lives of immigrants and minority groups in the United States with examinations of such contemporary issues as bilingual education, the conditions of migrant workers, and children as cultural and linguistic interpreters for their parents. The intentionally broad and interdisciplinary nature of the courses will enable us to explore cultural identities, socio-economic status, and gender specific roles.

ART 126: This is a hands-on laboratory intensive photography course. The focus is on the representation of land as landscape and the ways in which these images are situated within a complex relationship to the real, the imaginary. The symbolic, and collective/individual memory. Students will be introduced to large format cameras, film processes, and darkroom printing methods. The class will include shooting on location, long hours in the darkroom, and may require long walks and carrying equipment. Cameras, tripods, chemicals, and some film provided. Students will need to purchase paper and a few personal darkroom supplies on the first day of class. This is a two week intensive course taking place May 15 – May 25th

CSCI 005: Introduction to elements of computer science. Students learn computational problem-solving techniques and gain experience with the design, implementation, testing and documentation of programs in a high-level language. In addition, students learn to design digital devices, understand how computers operate, and learn to program in a small machine language. Students are also exposed to ideas in computability theory. The course includes discussions of societal and ethical issues related to computer science.

EA 31: Work in the Pitzer Outback, doing hands-on work while learning the science and societal components of ecological restoration. This course focuses on designing and implementing a restoration plan for the Pitzer Outback.  Students assess the Outback as a resource and develop a restoration strategy and management plan. The science and practice of ecological restoration is explored, and social perspectives that encompass the restoration project are examined.

ECON 51: An introductory course in the workings of the national economy-how the level of GDP is determined and why it fluctuates, the causes of inflation and unemployment, and the factors that influence the economy’s growth rate. The model of the economy that is developed can be used to examine the role of government, the international implications of domestic policies, the importance of public debt and deficits, and other current macro policy issues.

ECON 91: This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics.  The methods examined, however, have general application to a wide range of data analysis.  At the end of the class, you will:

(1) Understand the fundamentals of uncertainty and risk management

(2) Know how to use methods for estimation and forecasting,

(3) Be able combine knowledge of risk and estimation in optimization, and

(4) Know how to use the tools of statistical inference.

ENGL 34: This course is designed as a workshop focusing on the writing of fiction and the discourse of craft. Through the examination of a variety of literary traditions, stylistic and compositional approaches, and the careful reading and editing of peer stories, students will strengthen their prose and develop a clearer understanding of their own literary values and the dynamics of fiction.

MATH 189: In this course, we will start with big data challenges and examples. Then we will demonstrate how to use mathematical techniques to process big raw data including data indexing, visualization, structuring, representing, and reducing data dimension. We then present mathematical techniques for overcoming big data challenges especially focusing on the mathematics behind machine learning black boxes. Students will learn how to select an appropriate existing algorithm or a specific machine learning method, or integrate different algorithms for the big data problem at hand. We will use several examples including topic modeling and anomaly detection to demonstrate the key points involved, such as how to select an appropriate metric to distinguish between the normal and abnormal. We will end the course by demonstrating several examples of big data to decision using mathematical techniques. If time permits, we will also discuss optimal big data-to-decision.

MS 82A: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of video production and offers an intensive introduction to video production, specifically, digital video cameras, microphones, lighting, digital editing software, sound design and other post-production techniques. This course will examine video production through a series of exploratory projects, contextualizing them historically and formally by other experimental film and video art work. The class is critique-driven, and the discussions that follow the screening of each exercise are the principal method by which the successes and shortcomings of that work are evaluated. We will also be utilizing social media so you will be asked to create and use various new accounts if you don’t already have them.

MS 149: This course introduces students to the study of television from an aesthetic, theoretical, and critical perspective. Students will learn a number of terms, theoretical concepts, and methodological approaches to critically evaluate and analyze television texts, including the language of filmmaking, genre theory, cultural criticism, feminism, auteur theory, political economy, carnival theory, and audience ethnography.

PSYC 101: This course provides an introduction to the biological bases of cognition and behavior. Topics may include basic neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, visual and auditory perception, attention, language, hemispheric specialization, memory, emotion, motor control, and social neuroscience.

SOC 81: We will watch and analyze films (both documentaries and narratives) that address and illustrate key sociological concepts and insights, as well as pertinent social issues. This course is not about the sociology of film, per se. Rather, the goal is to learn about sociological ideas and social issues by using movies as our medium, as well as assigned reading and lectures.

Page last updated on May 17, 2017