2017 Summer Course Schedule

 

SESSION I  (May 15- June 23)

Course #

Title

Instructor

Days

Time

Room

AMST 120  Hyphenated Americans Isabel Balseiro (HMC)

MW

1pm – 4:10pm

TBA

ANTH 002 Intro to Socio-Cultural Anthropology Joanne Nucho (PO)

TTH

9am-12pm

TBA

ARHI 183 Art World Since 1989 Ciara Ennis (PZ)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

ART 109* Adobe and Brick Oven Construction Tim Berg (PZ) MTWRF (2 Week Course) 3pm-6pm

TBA

ART 113 Drawing Workshop Jessica McCoy (PZ)

TTH

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

ART 126* Large Format Landscape Photography Tarrah Krajnak (PZ)

 MTWTH (2 Week Course)

 1pm-6pm

TBA

ASTR 001 Introduction to Astronomy Elijah L. Quetin (PO)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

CHLT 100/ PHIL 120 (Cross-listed) Latin American and Carribbean Philosophy Gabriel Soldatenko (PZ)

MTWTH

10:45am- 12:20pm

TBA

CSCI005 Introduction to Computer Science Zach Dodds (HMC)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

DNCE 77A Modern Dance II Kevin Williamson (SC)

TTH

9am-12:10pm

TBA

DNCE 131 Critical Perspectives on Dance: Race, Gender and Sexuality Rainy Demerson (SC)

TTH

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

EA 114  Comparative Environmental Politics Paul Steinberg (HMC)

TTH

1pm – 4:10pm

TBA

EA 131  Restoring Nature Paul Faulstitch (PZ)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

EA 145 Ecology of Southern California Wallace Meyer (PO)

TTH

9am-12:10pm

TBA

ECON 51  Principles of Macro Economics Meric Keskinel (PZ)

MW

 1pm – 4:10pm

TBA

ECON 91  Statistics Roberto Pedace (SC)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

ENGL34 Fiction Workshop Adam Novy (PZ)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

GWS 26 Intro to Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Jih-Fei Cheng (SC) 

TTH

1pm – 4:10pm

TBA

HIST 16/  EA 16 (cross-listed) Environmental History Andre Wakefield (PZ)

TTH

9am-12:10pm

TBA

HIST Finding Your Family in History Laura Redford (SC)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

HIST Slavery and the Civil War in American Art Diana Linden (PZ)

MW

1pm-4:10pm

TBA

LGCS 10 Intro to Linguistics Meredith Landman (PZ)

TTH

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

MATH 32 Calculus III David Bachman (PZ)

MTWTH

10:45am-12:20pm

TBA

MATH 189 Big Data Analytics Weiqing Gu (HMC)

MWF

3:15pm-5:20pm

TBA

MS 052 Intro to French Cinema Virginie Duzer (PO)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

MS 82A Intro to Video Art Stephanie Hutin (PZ)

MW

1pm-4:10pm

TBA

MS 149 Theory and Aesthetics of Television Thomas Connelly (PO)

TTH

1pm-4:10pm

TBA

MUS 131 Mariachi Performance and Culture Candida Jaquez (SC)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

PHIL 007 Intro to Philosophy Kyle Thompson (CGU)

MW

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

PHIL144 Logic and Argumentation Yuval Avnur (SC)

MWF

3:15pm-5:20pm

TBA

POST 30 Intro to Comparative Politics Mark Schneider (PZ) 

MWF

3:15pm-5:20pm

TBA

PS 163 Feminist Political Thought Ashleigh Campi (SC)

TTH

9am-12:10pm

TBA

PSYC 10 Intro to Psychology Rakel Larson (PZ)

TTH

9am-12:10pm

TBA

PSYC 101 Brain and Behavior Thomas Borowski (PZ)

MWF

1pm-3:05pm

TBA

PSYC 150 Psychology of Close Relationships Debra Mashek (HMC)

TTH

1pm-4:10pm

TBA

RLST 138 American Religious History Julius Bailey (CMC)

MW

1pm-4:10pm

TBA

SOC 001 Sociology and Its View of the World Vadricka Etienne (PZ)

MW

9am-12:10pm

TBA

SOC 81 Sociology Through Film Phil Zuckerman (PZ)

TTH

7pm-10:10pm

TBA

* Courses with an asterisk are not 6 week courses, they are two week intensive courses (noted in their course descriptions). 

*Acronyms beside faculty names indicate their 5C college association: PZ= Pitzer College, PO= Pomona College, CMC= Claremont McKenna College, HMC= Harvey Mudd College, SC= Scripps College, CGU= Claremont Graduate University

Course Descriptions

AMST 120: This seminar focuses on the experience of immigrants in the United States and Americans of diverse ethnic backgrounds, as reflected in literature and critical theory. The course will weave together works that treat the lives of immigrants and minority groups in the United States with examinations of such contemporary issues as bilingual education, the conditions of migrant workers, and children as cultural and linguistic interpreters for their parents. The intentionally broad and interdisciplinary nature of the courses will enable us to explore cultural identities, socio-economic status, and gender specific roles.

ANTH 002: This course will provide students with an in-depth introduction to sociocultural anthropology. Key concepts covered include culture and cultural construction, language, kinship, religion, economies and exchange, politics, gender, race, development, and globalization. We will also read several ethnographies that bring many of these key concepts together in different contexts and discuss the ways that anthropology is relevant to understanding world events and contemporary problems. There are no prerequisites. Classroom activities will include a mix of discussions and short lectures. This course also insists that in order to understand why other people do things differently, you must actively reflect on why you do things in the way in which you may often consider to be “normal.” Reading about other cultures is one of the best ways to think about your own personal values and belief systems.

ARHI 183: This course provides an overview of developments in contemporary art since 1989. Emphasis is placed on the dominant practices and movements that have defined our increasingly globalized art world. The central themes under examination are appropriation, identity politics, site-specificity, institutional critique, relational aesthetics, and the impact of experimental curatorial practice and global biennales. These artistic developments will be examined as unique art practice evolutions as well as in relation to the changing sociopolitical and geopolitical contexts that have impacted cultural production during this period. The broad range of aesthetic and thematic responses that have occurred as a result of these transformations have set this recent period of contemporary art distinctly apart from previous eras.

ART 109: Students will learn about material properties, design implications and theoretical heat management while collaborating on the design, construction and permitting of an adobe and/or brick oven. Students will create unique designs that respond to a specific site. All tools and surface embellishments will be designed and fabricated by the students. This is a two week intensive course taking place between June 12 – June 23. 

ART 113: This advanced course emphasizes contemporary drawing techniques and concepts. The aim of the class is two-fold: to encourage experimentation and broaden your range of media and ideas. This is a class for serious art students of any major who are dedicated to the development of their personal style. You will need: open- mindedness to new media possibilities, willingness to put forth effort to perfect chosen techniques to a level of professional finish, and readiness to research your ideas for your work.

ART 126: This is a hands-on laboratory intensive photography course. The focus is on the representation of land as landscape and the ways in which these images are situated within a complex relationship to the real, the imaginary. The symbolic, and collective/individual memory. Students will be introduced to large format cameras, film processes, and darkroom printing methods. The class will include shooting on location, long hours in the darkroom, and may require long walks and carrying equipment. Cameras, tripods, chemicals, and some film provided. Students will need to purchase paper and a few personal darkroom supplies on the first day of class. This is a two week intensive course taking place May 15 – May 25th

ASTR 001: Introductory Astronomy. A non-calculus based survey course on modern astronomy with a focus on stellar, galactic and cosmic evolution. Particular emphasis will be placed on new and exciting observational results from space and ground-based observatories and how they shape our contemporary understanding of the formation and evolution of the universe and solar system.

CHLT 100/PHIL 120: This is a course designed to introduce students to the historical development and diversity of Latin American and Caribbean thought. To that end, a firm grounding in the region’s history and social landscape is necessary. Thus, the themes of conquest, colonialism, and slavery will be explored within their specific historical context, and philosophically broached in their long-term social consequences. Ultimately, students will gain an understanding of, and appreciation for, that in as much as Latin American and Caribbean philosophy is deeply influenced by Western philosophical modes of inquiry it also represents a distinct collection of philosophical traditions, concepts and problematics.

CSCI 005: Introduction to elements of computer science. Students learn computational problem-solving techniques and gain experience with the design, implementation, testing and documentation of programs in a high-level language. In addition, students learn to design digital devices, understand how computers operate, and learn to program in a small machine language. Students are also exposed to ideas in computability theory. The course includes discussions of societal and ethical issues related to computer science.

DNCE 77A: This intermediate Modern dance course emphasizes physical practice with improvisation and composition components. Some previous dance experience is required. Readings and written assignments about modern dance histories augment studio experiences. Full course.

DNCE 131: This course provides students an opportunity to critically investigate a variety of perspectives in current dance scholarship, as well as a platform to think, speak and write critically about dance as a cultural meaning producing activity, Readings in feminism, post-modernism, semiotics and cultural studies are used to analyze the intersections of gender, race and sexuality, and the power structures reflected in, and enacted by, dance.

EA 114: This course examines one of the most remarkable political developments of the past century: the rise, within a single generation, of environmental concern and associated social movements and public policies in far-flung societies around the globe.

EA 131: Work in the Pitzer Outback, doing hands-on work while learning the science and societal components of ecological restoration. This course focuses on designing and implementing a restoration plan for the Pitzer Outback.  Students assess the Outback as a resource and develop a restoration strategy and management plan. The science and practice of ecological restoration is explored, and social perspectives that encompass the restoration project are examined.

EA 145: This course will examine the primary literature and incorporate lectures from specialists from Southern California to explore theories, patterns, and predictive methods relating to the ecology of Southern California ecosystems. The focus of this course is to become well acquainted with the local biota, how different ecosystems function in Southern California, and be able to apply what was learned to the effective management of regional biota and resources.

ECON 51: An introductory course in the workings of the national economy-how the level of GDP is determined and why it fluctuates, the causes of inflation and unemployment, and the factors that influence the economy’s growth rate. The model of the economy that is developed can be used to examine the role of government, the international implications of domestic policies, the importance of public debt and deficits, and other current macro policy issues.

ECON 91: This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics.  The methods examined, however, have general application to a wide range of data analysis.  At the end of the class, you will:

(1) Understand the fundamentals of uncertainty and risk management

(2) Know how to use methods for estimation and forecasting,

(3) Be able combine knowledge of risk and estimation in optimization, and

(4) Know how to use the tools of statistical inference.

ENGL 34: This course is designed as a workshop focusing on the writing of fiction and the discourse of craft. Through the examination of a variety of literary traditions, stylistic and compositional approaches, and the careful reading and editing of peer stories, students will strengthen their prose and develop a clearer understanding of their own literary values and the dynamics of fiction.

GWS 26: This  course  introduces  students  to  the  dynamic  and  interdisciplinary  field(s)  of  Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality  Studies. Approaches and methodologies will attend to the intersections and confluences of race, gender, class, sexuality, and other axes of difference. We will address the racial, gender, sexual, and class politics of everyday  life as they are constituted  in culture, arranged  through  economic  structures,  developed  through  histories  of  colonialism,  enacted through  nationalism,  formulated  in science  and technology,  and intervened  into  and  through anti-racist, feminist, queer, and trans scholarship, art, and social movements.

HIST/EA 16: This course surveys some major topics in environmental history. Themes include: globalization and industrialization, political economy and nature, population growth, ecological imperialism, the history of ecology, the idea of wilderness, science and the environment, and global environmental change.

HIST (Redford, Course number TBA): This course provides students the opportunity to place their own ancestors as the main characters history, learn new research skills and hone their writing.  Participants will learn how to do basic family history research using public records, collecting oral histories, and internet resources. They will practice the art of history story telling by using that person’s experience in context of what was happening in that location at that time.

HIST (Linden, Course number TBA): This course addresses the ways in which Americans — painters, slaves, photographers, as well as today’s contemporary artists — represented slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction in both visual and material culture. We will begin with art from the antebellum era created by both slaves and abolitionists, focus on the Civil War including masterworks by leading American artists, and conclude with memorials to the Union Victory and the South’s “Lost Cause”. Lively discussions and illustrated slide lectures will make for a dynamic classroom experience. No prior knowledge of Civil War history needed.

LGCS 10: This course is an introduction to linguistics, the scientific study of language. Topics will include: how sounds are produced and how they combine; how words are formed from their component parts; how sentences are constructed and how their meaning is understood; how languages change over time; how languages are alike and how they differ; and how language use reflects aspects of our identity.

MATH 32: Vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives and differentiability of functions of several variables, multiple integrals.

MATH 189: In this course, we will start with big data challenges and examples. Then we will demonstrate how to use mathematical techniques to process big raw data including data indexing, visualization, structuring, representing, and reducing data dimension. We then present mathematical techniques for overcoming big data challenges especially focusing on the mathematics behind machine learning black boxes. Students will learn how to select an appropriate existing algorithm or a specific machine learning method, or integrate different algorithms for the big data problem at hand. We will use several examples including topic modeling and anomaly detection to demonstrate the key points involved, such as how to select an appropriate metric to distinguish between the normal and abnormal. We will end the course by demonstrating several examples of big data to decision using mathematical techniques. If time permits, we will also discuss optimal big data-to-decision.

MS 052: This course focuses on the aesthetics of a small selection of “classic” films and the cultural, philosophical and political cultures out of which they were produced as an introduction to the major styles and directors of French cinema. linguistic, technical and theoretical tools for cinematic analysis will be taught to students. Possible filmmakers include Meliés, Renoir,  Resnais, Rohmer, Truffaut, Godard,  Varda and Ackerman (all films will be shown with subtitles).

MS 82A: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of video production and offers an intensive introduction to video production, specifically, digital video cameras, microphones, lighting, digital editing software, sound design and other post-production techniques. This course will examine video production through a series of exploratory projects, contextualizing them historically and formally by other experimental film and video art work. The class is critique-driven, and the discussions that follow the screening of each exercise are the principal method by which the successes and shortcomings of that work are evaluated. We will also be utilizing social media so you will be asked to create and use various new accounts if you don’t already have them.

MS 149: This course introduces students to the study of television from an aesthetic, theoretical, and critical perspective. Students will learn a number of terms, theoretical concepts, and methodological approaches to critically evaluate and analyze television texts, including the language of filmmaking, genre theory, cultural criticism, feminism, auteur theory, political economy, carnival theory, and audience ethnography.

MUS 131: Develop introductory musical fluency in a Mexican traditional music; become familiar with seminal historical and contemporary concepts concerning Mexican descent populations in the US; develop critical inquiry skills in analyzing music and culture through an interdisciplinary framework.

PHIL 007: What’s so great about thinking and knowledge? In the course of the semester, we will investigate that value of a philosophical life by taking a journey through the history of Western philosophy, from Socrates & Plato to Sartre. Along the way, we will consider perennial philosophical questions about the nature of justice, the relationship between mind & body, free will, the problem of evil and arguments for the existence of God.

PHIL 144: Why Learn Logic?

First and foremost, this course concerns good reasoning. Learning logic will make you an even better reasoner. When you reason now, you very likely pay close attention to the content of the argument under scrutiny. That makes a lot of sense. There is, however, more to an argument than its content. Logic abstracts from the content of arguments and uses a formal language to capture an argument’s structure. As you learn, your ability to recognize the structure of an argument will improve. It will gradually become apparent to you how two people speaking on completely different topics may deploy the very same pattern of reasoning (sometimes painfully apparent: you’ll often see politicians and PR reps deploying the same bad pattern of reasoning). It’s this recognitional skill that helps you become a better reasoner, writer, interlocutor, speaker, and thinker. Finally, on a more practical note, knowing logic often helps on standardized tests like the LSAT and the GRE.

POST 30: What’s happening in the world seems hard to comprehend, but political science begs to differ. This course provides a broad overview of the subfield of comparative politics by focusing on, and putting into broader context, important substantive questions facing the world from violence to elections to the kinds of political parties that emerge in different contexts. The course is organized around four substantive themes. First, why can some countries depend on the state to enforce order and encourage development while others cannot? Second, under what conditions should we expect democracies to emerge and endure? Third, what different institutional forms do democratic government take and why does this matter? Fourth, what are the different patterns of representation and accountability, and problems that can undermine this, in the developing world? To understand these conceptual questions, we will consider a range of cases from South Asia, Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and Europe.

PS 163: Feminist political thinkers shed light on the role of gender in shaping our social position and experience of the world. In this course, we will read authors who take up questions of gender-based oppression in order to make visible marginalized persons and groups, and seek out practices of political empowerment and solidarity. We consider themes and episodes including the women’s,  black feminist, and Chicana liberation movements; the evolving problem of gender and capitalism -from women’s  relegation to the domestic sphere to the contemporary  exploitation of care work in neoliberal economies; racialized sexuality and governmental power; experiences of inheritance, depression, anxiety, and anger; and reparative strategies of care and resistance. We read authors including Angela Davis, Nancy Fraser, Sara Ahmed, Judith Butler, Jose Munoz, and Nina Power.

PSYC 10: The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to psychology as it developed from a nonscientific interest to a scientific approach to human behavior. Special attention will be given to some of the major systems, issues and methods involved in contemporary psychology. Students will be expected to serve as participants in experiments.

PSYC 101: This course provides an introduction to the biological bases of cognition and behavior. Topics may include basic neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, visual and auditory perception, attention, language, hemispheric specialization, memory, emotion, motor control, and social neuroscience.

PSYC 150: This course introduces participants to the leading theoretical perspectives employed by social psychologists in the study of close romantic relationships. We will examine a number of relationship-relevant constructs and events through the lenses offered by these different theories. The discussions, readings, assignments, and activities are all designed to introduce participants to these theories and topics in an engaging, intellectually rigorous fashion.  All participants are expected to take an active role in the classroom by asking questions, providing insights, and engaging fully in discussions and demonstrations.

RLST 138: This course is a survey of religion in America from the pre-colonial era to the present. We will explore particular historical moments and important themes in American religious history that have shaped the development of the nation. The course moves chronologically, examining traditions such as Native American religions, the Puritans, Evangelicalism, Asian religions, and Catholicism and analyzing contemporary and enduring concerns in American society such as church/state issues, religious “cults,” and fundamentalism and politics.

SOC 001: Sociology is an exciting field of study that encourages people to think differently about their social worlds. Sociologists challenge common-sense notions about the world and study issues, ideologies, and the minutia of everyday life that we take for granted. We problematize, investigate, and critique aspects of society such as culture, norms, and institutions. This course will introduce you to basic sociological concepts and theories. You will learn what it means to ask sociological questions and be challenged to rethink your own positions about problems in society. My goal as an instructor is for you to leave with more than a cursory understanding of sociology but the ability to competently examine present day social phenomena and “see” the applicability of sociological concepts and theories. In addition, I expect that due to class instruction, each of you will strive to learn from one another’s input by engaging in critical discussion, group activities, and lectures.

SOC 81: We will watch and analyze films (both documentaries and narratives) that address and illustrate key sociological concepts and insights, as well as pertinent social issues. This course is not about the sociology of film, per se. Rather, the goal is to learn about sociological ideas and social issues by using movies as our medium, as well as assigned reading and lectures.

Page last updated on March 21, 2017