2013-14 Writing Workshops

Writing Center workshops are interactive and designed to teach effective approaches to the writing process. They’re designed for students who’d like to develop further as critical thinkers, readers, and writers. They’re also open to all members of the Pitzer community interested in writing or the teaching of writing.

RSVPs to writing@pitzer.edu are appreciated but not required. To schedule a one-on-one consultation with a Writing Center Fellow, please use our online appointment system at pitzer.mywconline.com.

Spring 2014 Workshops

Please also consider participating in “Love Your Library Workshops,” which include sessions on information literacy and source management tools. Hosted by the library.

Senior Thesis Boot Camp
Fri Jan 31, 1pm-4pm
230 Scott Hall

Get a jump start on your thesis by committing to writing in the company of others. We’ll open boot camp with a short workshop on managing your time and developing a writing plan. You’ll then write for 2 ½ hours, tackling one step of your new plan.  We’ll debrief at the end to share strategies for sustaining your momentum and accessing resources this spring. Bring your laptop and any materials you’ll need to write.

Managing Your Sources in a Literature Review
Fri Feb 7, 1-2:15pm
230 Scott Hall

Working on a senior thesis or project? Need to get geared up for a semester of writing and research? Please bring your laptop (with access to thesis/notes-in-progress) to this interactive workshop with Writing Center Director Andrea Scott and Librarian Natalie Tagge on ways to refine your writing and research. You’ll evaluate your thesis for gaps in writing and research and will leave the session with a clear plan to move forward towards thesis success.

Become a Writing Center Fellow in 2014-15: Information Session
Wed Feb 19, 7pm-8pm & (again) Tues Feb 25, 7pm-8pm
230 Scott Hall

Interested in becoming a Writing Center Fellow next year? Come learn more about the position and how to apply. Writing Center Fellows are Pitzer students who consult with fellow writers on projects in any discipline. They receive intensive training in the teaching of writing valuable to their development as educators and writers. If you consider yourself a thoughtful reader and writer and enjoy engaging fellow writers in conversations about writing, a Fellow position in the Writing Center might be for you. All first-year, second-year, and third-year Pitzer students in any discipline are welcome to apply. We seek strong writers in the humanities, social sciences, and biological and natural sciences.  Application deadline: Mon Mar 3.

Developing a Research Question
Fri Feb 21, 1-2:15pm
230 Scott Hall

Academic writing is the art of asking good questions and discovering surprising responses.  How do writers across the disciplines develop questions that are interesting to their readers? In this workshop, you’ll develop strategies for generating analytical questions, assessing their feasibility, and conveying their importance to your readers.  We’ll practice ways from moving from a topic to a research question, leaving you with a stronger sense of your project’s focus.  Bring your laptop with access to your project-in-progress.

The Anatomy of Scientific Writing
Fri Feb 28, 1-2:15pm
230 Scott Hall

Scientific Writing involves more than “writing up” results. It’s a genre of writing constructed to persuade the scientific community of a finding’s significance. Like all writing, it requires careful planning. In this workshop, we’ll analyze the anatomy of the scientific research paper from the abstract to the discussion section, reaching a deeper understanding of the form and function of each part. In the second half, we’ll workshop a section of your own scientific academic writing to sharpen its impact. Bring your laptop with access to your project-in-progress.

Situating Yourself in a Scholarly Conversation
Fri Mar 7, 1-2:15pm
230 Scott Hall

Scholarly writing is paradoxical: you’re asked to position yourself in a pre-existing debate while also transforming the terms of that debate. Why is this so? For starters, academic readers seek to understand the “new” in relation to the “old.” This workshop will equip you with several strategies for using scholarly sources to develop an original argument that attends to a current issue in your field. Bring your laptop with access to your project-in-progress.

Teaching Multilingual Writers
Tues Mar 27, 2:45-4pm
230 Scott Hall

A workshop on teaching writing to multilingual writers. Designed for Writing Center Fellows, Pitzer students interested in teaching writing to multilingual students (in the US or abroad), and faculty. Details to follow.

Senior Thesis Boot Camp, Part II
Apr 4, 1-4pm
230 Scott Hall

Keep ahead of the game. Revisit your writing plan to ensure a successful finish this month. You’ll commit to 2 ½  hours of writing in the company of your peers and will make significant progress on your thesis.  Debriefing groups will help you develop a plan for completing your thesis.